Delaware

The Political Report – 6/9/22

Rep. Karen Bass (D-CA) and billionaire developer Rick Caruso are headed to a November runoff in the nationally watched race to become Los Angeles’ next mayor, the AP reports.

“San Francisco voters overwhelmingly voted to remove District Attorney Chesa Boudin from office on Tuesday, favoring a recall effort that argued his progressive reforms were too lenient and made the city less safe,” the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

Axios: “Boudin’s recall may spell trouble for progressive prosecutors across the country who are increasingly facing scrutiny from voters amid rising crime rates.”

Washington Post: “Last night, Audrey Trujillo (R) became the latest 2020 election denier to win her party’s nomination to oversee a state’s elections.”

“The New Mexico Republican is part of a wave of candidates beholden to conspiracy theories about election hacking and fraud who are seeking to lead elections in more than a dozen states — including in many states that were decisive in President Biden’s victory.”

Politico: “Two weeks after Donald Trump was humiliated in Georgia’s primaries, a lower-profile collection of Republicans on Tuesday were putting a finer point on the limitations of Trump’s influence over the GOP.”

“It’s still enormous, of course. But five of the 35 House Republicans who voted to create a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol appeared on ballots on Tuesday. And all of them appear to have survived to fight another day.”

Ron Brownstein: “An earthquake is building in Tuesday’s California elections that could rattle the political landscape from coast to coast.”

“In Los Angeles and San Francisco, two of the nation’s most liberal large cities, voters are poised to send stinging messages of discontent over mounting public disorder, as measured in both upticks in certain kinds of crime and pervasive homelessness.”

“That dissatisfaction could translate into the recall of San Francisco’s left-leaning district attorney, Chesa Boudin, likely by a resounding margin, and a strong showing in the Los Angeles mayoral primary by Rick Caruso, a billionaire real estate developer and former Republican who has emerged as the leading alternative in the race to Democratic US Rep. Karen Bass, once considered the front-runner.”

Nellie Bowles: “I do need you to love San Francisco a little bit, like I do a lot, in order to hear the story of how my city fell apart—and how it just might be starting to pull itself back together.”

“Because yesterday, San Francisco voters decided to turn their district attorney, Chesa Boudin, out of office. They did it because he didn’t seem to care that he was making the citizens of our city miserable in service of an ideology that made sense everywhere but in reality. It’s not just about Boudin, though. There is a sense that, on everything from housing to schools, San Francisco has lost the plot—that progressive leaders here have been LARPing left-wing values instead of working to create a livable city. And many San Franciscans have had enough.”

With redistricting complete, The Economist finds America’s congressional maps are a bit fairer than a decade ago, but even fewer seats in Congress will be competitive.

“A federal judge has ordered Louisiana’s Republican-dominated Legislature, which overpowered the state’s Democratic governor to enact a congressional map favorable to the GOP, to redraw the map to add a second majority-Black district,” the Baton Rouge Advocate reports.

ALABAMA U.S. SENATOR. Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) took to Twitter to pressure Donald Trump to “re-endorse” him in the Alabama Republican U.S. Senate runoff.

The congressman got some more disappointing news the following day when Army veteran Mike Durant, who took third with 23%, announced that he wouldn’t support or even vote for either Britt or Brooks. While Durant claimed hours before polls closed on May 24 that he’d endorse Brooks over Britt, he now says, “Mo Brooks has been in politics for 40 years, and all he does is run his mouth.” Durant also had harsh words for the frontrunner, arguing, “Katie Britt doesn’t deserve to be a senator.”

Politico reports that the Club for Growth’s Conservative Outsiders PAC is spending $800,000 on what reporter Natalie Allison characterizes as the Club’s “final” buy in support of Rep. Mo Brooks for the June 21 GOP runoff. The spot comes days after the Club reportedly cut $500,000 in ad time meant to help Brooks.

The narrator argues that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s allies are attacking the congressman because they “prefer a lobbyist” like his opponent, former Business Council of Alabama head Katie Britt, over a “proven conservative” like Brooks. The voiceover continues, “Britt ran a special interest group that worked with D.C. lobbyists backing amnesty for over 1 million illegal immigrants. And, Britt’s group opposed making it harder for businesses to hire illegals.”

NEW YORK GOVERNOR. Last week was the deadline for independent candidates to turn in the 45,000 signatures they’d need to make the November ballot, and disgraced former Gov. Andrew Cuomo did not submit any petitions.

MASSACHUSETTS GOVERNOR. Attorney General Maura Healey won Saturday’s Democratic Party convention with 71% of the delegates, while the balance went to state Sen. Sonia Chang-Díaz. Chang-Díaz took considerably more than the 15% she needed in order to secure a spot on the September primary ballot for governor, but she faces a wide polling and financial deficit.

MICHIGAN GOVERNOR. The Michigan Supreme Court on Friday ruled against former Detroit police Chief James Craig and wealthy businessman Perry Johnson’s attempts to get on the August Republican primary ballot after state election authorities disqualified them for fraudulent voter petition signatures, but neither of them is giving up hope of still capturing the GOP nod.

Craig acknowledged last month that he would consider a write-in campaign if his legal challenge failed, and he said Sunday on Fox, “It’s not over. We are going to be evaluating next steps.” While Craig doesn’t appear to have addressed the possibility of a write-in campaign since the state’s highest court gave him the thumbs down, he responded in the affirmative when asked, “Are they trying to steal your election?” Johnson, for his part, asked a federal judge the following day to halt the printing of primary ballots.

MARYLAND GOVERNOR. The first independent poll of the July 19 Democratic primary comes from OpinionWorks on behalf of the University of Baltimore and the Baltimore Sun, and it finds state Comptroller Peter Franchot in the lead with 20%. Author Wes Moore is close behind with 15%, while former DNC chair Tom Perez and former Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker take 12% and 7%, respectively; a 31% plurality remains undecided.

While former U.S. Secretary of Education John King snagged just 4%, here, though, his own numbers show him in far better shape. He released an internal from 2020 Insight last month that showed Franchot at 17% as King and Moore took 16%; Perez took the same 12% that OpinionWorks gave him, while 27% were undecided.

OpinionWorks also gives us a rare look at the GOP primary and has former state Commerce Secretary Kelly Schulz, who is backed by termed-out Gov. Larry Hogan, beating Trump-endorsed Del. Dan Cox 27-21; wealthy perennial candidate Robin Ficker is a distant third with 5%, while a hefty 42% of respondents didn’t choose a candidate.

KANSAS GOVERNOR. Wednesday was the filing deadline for Kansas’ Aug. 2 primaries, and the state has a list of contenders here.

While several Republicans initially showed interest in taking on incumbent Laura Kelly, who is is the only Democratic governor up for re-election this year in a state that Donald Trump carried, Attorney General Derek Schmidt has essentially had the field to himself ever since former Gov. Jeff Colyer dropped out in August. The RGA isn’t waiting for Schmidt to vanquish his little-known primary foe, as it’s already running a commercial promoting him as an alternative to Kelly.

State Sen. Dennis Pyle, a conservative hardliner who recently left the GOP to become an independent, announced Tuesday that he would challenge Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly without a party affiliation, a move that could ease Kelly’s path to victory against Republican Attorney General Derek Schmidt. Pyle, who needs to turn in 5,000 valid signatures by Aug. 1 in order to qualify for the general election ballot, explained his decision in a statement arguing, “Due to the continual gross negligence in protecting and assisting citizens, my family and I have decided it is in the best interest of our state that I pursue running for Governor to enact solutions to stop the hardship of Kansans.”

Pyle himself has made a name for himself for trying to make it more difficult to vote in Kansas and for trying to hobble the state government’s response to COVID, but Republicans quickly sought to portray him as anything but a right-winger. Schmidt, who faces no serious opposition in the Republican primary, labeled Pyle a “fake conservative.” Kansans for Life also blasted the new candidate for “playing games with the lives of preborn babies and their mothers,” a reference to his missed vote for a proposed anti-abortion constitutional amendment (Pyle says he was absent for personal reasons).

Pyle himself has come into conflict numerous times with his now-former party’s leadership long before this. In 2010, he tried to ride the tea party wave to D.C. by challenging Rep. Lynn Jenkins for renomination in the 2nd Congressional District, but he lost 57-43. (He also took fifth in the 2018 primary to replace the retiring Jenkins.) Pyle this year opposed the legislature’s successful drive to pass a new congressional gerrymander, which resulted in him losing most of his committee assignments.

MISSOURI U.S. SENATOR. A new Emerson College poll in Missouri finds Eric Greitens (R) with 26% support in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, followed by Eric Schmitt (R) at 20%, Vicky Hartzler (R) at 16% and Billy Long (R) at 8%.

While state Attorney General Eric Schmitt’s allies at Save Missouri Values PAC have largely focused on attacking disgraced former Gov. Eric Greitens ahead of the August GOP primary, the super PAC is now spending $510,000 on an offensive against a third candidate, Rep. Vicky Hartzler. The spot argues that Hartzler “voted to give amnesty to over 1.8 million illegal immigrants, and she even voted to use our tax dollars to fund lawyers for illegals who invaded our country.”

COLORADO U.S. SENATOR. Wealthy businessman Joe O’Dea has publicized a survey from Public Opinion Strategies that gives him a 38-14 lead over state Rep. Ron Hanks in the June 28 Republican primary to face Democratic incumbent Michael Bennet. O’Dea has also announced that he’s spending $325,000 on a TV and radio campaign against Hanks, who ended March with all of $16,000 in the bank.

GEORGIA GOVERNOR. “Almost as soon as Stacey Abrams called Georgia the ‘worst state in the country to live,’ the Democrat’s campaign expected the remark to be the center of new GOP attacks. Gov. Brian Kemp’s first TV ad of the general election cycle does exactly that,” the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports.

PENNSYLVANIA U.S. SENATOR. Democratic nominee John Fetterman has been off the campaign trail since he suffered a stroke on May 13, and his wife told CNN Monday, “I think he deserves a month break to come back as strong as ever.” However, when Giselle Fetterman was asked if the candidate would be back in July, she responded, “Maybe. I think so. That’s my hope.”

That same day, John Fetterman’s campaign began its first general election ads with a $250,000 buy on Fox News, which is usually not a venue where Democrats like to promote themselves. Unsurprisingly, though, the spots (here and here) focus on the lieutenant governor’s blue collar image while highlighting him as an untraditional politician: In one commercial filmed before his health emergency, the 6 ‘9 tattooed candidate tells the audience, “I do not look like a typical politician. I don’t even look like a typical person.”

WISCONSIN GOVERNOR. Four notable Republicans are competing to take on Democratic incumbent Tony Evers in what will be one of the most competitive governor contests in the nation.

The early frontrunner was former Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, who has the backing of her old boss, former Gov. Scott Walker, but she may be in for a tougher nomination battle than she expected. A mid-May survey from Public Policy Polling showed her narrowly trailing wealthy businessman Tim Michels, who badly lost the 2004 Senate race to Democratic incumbent Russ Feingold, 27-26, and Trump has since endorsed Michels. The field also includes businessman Kevin Nicholson, a former College Democrats of America president who lost a competitive 2018 Senate GOP primary, and state Rep. Timothy Ramthun, an ardent Big Lie proponent, though PPP showed them each badly lagging.

Amusingly, while Michels launched his bid for governor in late April by pledging, “I will never ask anyone for a donation,” the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Daniel Bice notes that Michels almost immediately began … asking people for donations. Michels this week also argued he’d remained a Wisconsinite despite owning multi-million dollar homes in Connecticut and New York, where his three children graduated high school, insisting, “I’m not going to apologize for my success.”

KENTUCKY GOVERNOR. State Rep. Savannah Maddox announced Tuesday that she was joining next year’s Republican primary to take on Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear. Maddox, who once labeled Beshear’s pandemic health measures “tyranny,” is a close ally of 4th District Rep. Thomas Massie, and the duo last month backed three successful primary challenges against Maddox’s colleagues. The state representative launched her campaign for governor this week by framing the nomination contest as between “moderate Republicans” and “an authentic conservative who has a proven track record of fighting every day for our freedoms.”

ARIZONA GOVENROR. The Republican pollster Data Orbital’s newest look at the August GOP primary shows former TV news anchor Kari Lake with a small 27-23 edge over Board of Regents member Karrin Taylor Robson, with former Rep. Matt Salmon well behind with 12%. While no other firm has released numbers showing things this close, Data Orbital finds Lake’s lead expanding to 35-21 once respondents are informed she’s Trump’s choice. Still, even if those numbers are on target, it hardly guarantees that Lake only has room to grow as more voters learn about the Trump endorsement.

Georgia Republican David Perdue found that out the hard way after a December survey from Insider Advantage showed his 41-22 primary deficit against Gov. Brian Kemp transforming into a 34-34 tie after the pollster followed up, “As you may have heard, President Trump is planning to endorse David Perdue in the Republican Primary for Governor. Knowing this information, how would you vote?” Perdue spent the next months doing everything he possibly could to let the base know he was Trump’s guy, but primary voters ended up rewarding him with a landslide 74-22 defeat.

Robson, like Kemp, is doing what she can to make sure this primary turns into anything other than a choice between a Trump-backed candidate and everyone else, and she’s turning to former Gov. Jan Brewer to make her case that Lake isn’t actually a loyal conservative. Brewer, who left office in 2015, begins a new ad for Robson by recounting her battles with the Obama administration over immigration before a picture flashes by of Lake with Obama. The former governor tells the audience, “Kari Lake? She donated to Obama and published a radical plan that even the liberal Arizona Republic called ‘mass amnesty.'” Brewer spends the rest of the spot touting Robson as “a fighter, like me.”

ALASKA GOVERNOR. GOP Gov. Mike Dunleavy is going up against four Republicans, four unaffiliated contenders, and one Democrat, former state Rep. Les Gara. The prominent challenger in this lot is former Gov. Bill Walker, an independent who was elected to his only term in 2014 with Democratic support but abandoned his re-election campaign four years later in an unsuccessful attempt to stop Dunleavy from winning. The incumbent also faces intra-party opposition from state Rep. Christopher Kurka and Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce, who are each positioning themselves to the right of the ardently conservative governor.  

Delaware politics from a liberal, progressive and Democratic perspective. Keep Delaware Blue.

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